Speaker Bios

UNESCO is honoured to welcome some of the world's leading experts in their respective fields to this Symposium

 
 
ASLAN Zaki

ASLAN Zaki

Zaki Aslan is a conservation architect, who has been the Manager of ICCROM’s ATHAR Programme (Conservation of Cultural Heritage in the Arab Region) since 2003. Dr. Aslan provided technical advice and extensive training programmes to the Arab States in the Mediterranean and the Gulf countries on issues related to heritage conservation, management and planning, World Heritage procedures, national heritage strategies and governance, as well as education and curricula development at graduate level.

Graduated in Architecture in 1988, Dr. Aslan holds a Ph.D. in Heritage Conservation and Management from the University College London (UCL), U.K., and a M.Sc. degree in Conservation of the Built Environment from the University of Montreal in Canada (1991). He previously worked as consultant for UNESCO, European Union, and ICCROM on projects in the field of heritage conservation and management in the Near East and Arab countries (2000-2002), including World Heritage education, training and development projects. He served as project manager at the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities of Jordan in the mid-90s, where he was engaged in the US-funded Cultural Resource Management Programme in Jordan (CRM), and worked on the "Documentation and Conservation of Stone Monuments" in the World Heritage Site of Petra. He also studied stone conservation and documentation methods at the Bavarian State Conservation Office in Munich and Regensburg (Germany) in 1994.

He is a co-author of a UNESCO-ICCROM teacher's guide titled "Introducing Young People to Heritage Site Management and Protection” and editor of ICCROM-ATHAR Publication Series: Issues in the Conservation of Cultural Heritage in the Arab Region. Dr. Aslan is an advisory member at the 2nd Category World Heritage Centre for the Arab states in Bahrain. He is also honorary senior lecturer at UCL, and has been Adjunct Professor at the American University of Sharjah (College of Architecture, Art and Design). He is member of the editorial board of the "Journal of Conservation and Management of Archaeological Sites", Maney Publishing, U.K.

BOUCHENAKI Mounir

BOUCHENAKI Mounir

Mounir Bouchenaki  born in November 1943 in Tlemcen ( Algeria)  contributed during the last three yearsto the launching of a UNESCO category II Centre, The Arab Regional Centre for World Heritage based in Bahrain.

He was elected Director-General of ICCROM (International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property) in November 2005 and acted in such capacity until 31 December 2011. His appointment at ICCROM followed a long career at UNESCO, where he was Assistant Director-General for Culture from end 1999 to early 2006.  Previously, Mr. Bouchenaki had been Director of the Division of Cultural Heritage and Director of the World Heritage Center at UNESCO, and in his own country, Director of Antiquities, Museums and Historic Monuments in the Algerian Ministry of Culture and Information. Mr. Bouchenaki holds a Ph.D. in archaeology and ancient history from the Arts Faculty of Aix-en-Provence (France). He has been awarded the titles of Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres and Officier des Arts et des Lettres by the French Ministry of Culture, and in 2002 was raised to the rank of Commendatore of the Order of the Star of Italian Solidarity by the President of the Italian Republic. He was awarded by the President of the French Republic the title of "Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur".   In November 2007 he received the “Médaille d'or du Mérite Culturel d'Algérie”, awarded by the Algerian Ministry of Culture. . In 2013, he was awarded the Medal of Cultural Merit of the Kingdom of Cambodia. In 2017 he received the Medal of Cultural Merit from the Principality of Monaco.   He is still providing his expertise, as Member of  ad hoc Expert to the ICC.  Currently, Mounir Bouchenaki, is the Special Advisor to the Director-General of ICCROM and Special Advisor to the  Director-General of UNESCO.

M. Bouchenaki is Member of a number of professional associations such as ICOM andICOMOS, and Member of Advisory Boards of Institutions such as the Smithsonian Institute, the State Hermitage Museum, the “Conseil du Centre National de la Recherche Archéologique in Algeria, and the “Comité National Français pour les Biens du Patrimoine Mondial”.

He is the author of a number of publications related to Ancient History and Cultural Heritage.

CAMERON Christina

CAMERON Christina

Christina Cameron is a Professor in the School of Architecture and Canada Research Chair on Built Heritage at the University of Montreal. She serves as Chair of the Advisory Committee on the Official Residences of Canada and President of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO. She worked at Parks Canada for thirty five years, including as Director General of National Historic Sites and as Secretary to the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. She has been actively involved in World Heritage as Head of Delegation for Canada (1990-2008), Chairperson (1990, 2008) and Rapporteur (1989). She teaches a Masters seminar on World Heritage, and carries out related research including a recent publication on the early years of the World Heritage Convention. She has received a multitude of national and international awards for her professional and volunteer work, including an Outstanding Achievement Award (2007) from the Government of Canada, the National Trust of Canada’s Gabrielle Léger Medal for Lifetime Achievement (2014), and the Order of Canada (2014).

CISSÉ Lassana

CISSÉ Lassana

Lassana Cissé holds a Master of Philosophy. He is a site manager and expert in heritage and local development, more than 20 years.

He has been working for more than 20 years with the Ministry of Culture and is the Manager of Bandiagara Cliffs World Heritage Site. From 2013 to 2016, he was the National Director of Cultural Heritage of Mali, and National Coordinator of the program for the reconstruction of damaged heritage in the northern regions of Mali (Timbuktu and Gao) after armed conflict in 2012. This program was implemented in close collaboration with UNESCO and other technical and financial partners.

Independent expert since January 2017, he is part of UNESCO's network of African experts for the 1972, 2003 and 2005 Conventions.

He is a member of ICOMOS-ISCEAH and is often contracted for provision of services to ICOMOS (expertise), UNESCO-WHC.

He attended a lot of conference and meeting on international level and represented Mali, as expert, at World Heritage Committee Sessions since 1998.

DE CARO Stefano

DE CARO Stefano

Stefano De Caro is the Director-General of ICCROM, since January 2012.

He holds a degree in Humanities (1972) from the "Federico II" University of Naples.  He continued his studies in archaeology at the National School of Archaeology in Rome,  “La Sapienza” University of Rome, and at the Italian School of Archaeology in Athens, Greece. He has served in the ranks of the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities from 1976 to 2010 in many different positions: Inspector and Director Archaeologist in the Molise region and in the Province of Naples (Pompeii); Superintendent for Archaeology in the Provinces of Naples and Caserta; Deputy Director of the Special Agency for the restorations of cultural heritage in the regions of Campania and Basilicata, following the 1980-81 earthquakes; Director-Regional for Cultural Heritage and Landscape in Campania; Director-General of Antiquities at the Ministry’s  Central Office in Rome.

Among the many tasks covered in this career, he undertook archaeological excavations and rescue archaeology campaigns, and was actively engaged in conservation, protection and restoration of ancient and modern monuments, sites and landscapes, as well as the creation and management of museums, organization of exhibitions, negotiations for the repatriation of cultural objects illegally exported, scientific publications and lectures, etc.  In the same years he has taught onnumerous courses on various archaeological disciplines in many Universities in Campania and has published more than 300 texts (books and articles).

Member of the British Academy and of the Deutsche Archäologische Institut, awarded for Outstanding Public Service by the Archaeological Institute of America, he was also decorated as Chevalier of the French Republic Legion d’honneur, and as Knight, Commander and Great Officer of the Italian Republic.

HADZIMUHAMEDOVIC Amra

HADZIMUHAMEDOVIC Amra

Amra Hadžimuhamedović teaches Architectural Conservation and History of Architecture at the International University of Sarajevo and she is Director of Canter for Cultural Heritage in International Forum Bosnia. She has been engaged in bringing together spatial planning and heritage protection through practical action, scientific research work, writing and education. She was awarded Charter of the Ministry of Culture and Sport for her personal contribution to the preservation and restoration of Bosnia’s cultural heritage in 2011.

During the period 2001-2016 she was heading the Commission to Preserve National Monuments of Bosnia and Herzegovina - established under the Dayton Peace Accord to integrate cultural heritage into post war recovery in Bosnia - which received the European Union Prize for Cultural Heritage/Europa Nostra for Dedicated Service in 2010. She was awarded a research fellowship at the ICCROM in 2008. As an ICCROM fellow she researched method of reconstruction through the history of cultural memory preservation and published widely on reconstruction.   

She has been guest lecturing at universities in Europe and USA, as well as at the international specialist courses in Kosovo, Palestine, Italy, Sweden, Cyprus, Bosnia and Albania. While working in the Canter for Cultural Heritage of International Forum Bosnia, she develops strategy of research, education, conservation and publications in the field of integrating cultural heritage reconstruction into transitional justice process and the global peace based on sharing universal values.

She is a member of International Scientific Committee on History and Theory of Conservation and has worked on conservation projects and cultural heritage management plans (around 90 projects), and publishes widely (around 70 publications), including the books Human Rights and Destruction of Cultural Heritage, published by Norwegian and Bosnian Helsinki Committees for Human Rights and the most recent Heritage, War, and Peace, published in Bosnian by the Sarajevo University.

HOLTORF Cornelius

HOLTORF Cornelius

Cornelius Holtorf is Professor of Archaeology at Linnaeus University in Kalmar, Sweden. He directs the Graduate School in Contract Archaeology and is spokesperson of the Centre for Applied Heritage at his University. He has published extensively on archaeology and heritage in contemporary society, including critical studies of the conservation paradigm and its preference for ‘loss aversion’. For Holtorf, sustainable heritage management involves first and foremost the ability of society to cope with loss and adapt to change. He has also been focusing on the values and functions of built heritage, emphasizing that even rebuilt and fictitious heritage can play a significant role in society and that the past therefore is a renewable resource (see e.g. From Stonehenge to Las Vegas. Archaeology as Popular Culture, 2005).

His current research interests include heritage futures; long-term communication about final repositories of nuclear waste; and experiencing the past through embodied time travelling. He is a Co-Investigator in the Heritage Futures project based at University College London, UK. Holtorf has a background in prehistoric archaeology, social anthropology and physical anthropology. He completed his Doctoral research in 1998 at the University of Wales, Lampeter with a study of the life-history of megalithic monuments. A native German, he has lived for many years in the UK and more recently in Sweden.

Dr. Nobuko Inaba is a professor in World Heritage Studies, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Japan. Trained as a conservation architect and architectural historian, she received her doctoral degree from the Tokyo Institute of Technology on the theme of the 19th century architecture and conservation history of Japan.

She gained her practical knowledge and experience in heritage policy development and management while serving in the Japanese government's Agency for Cultural Affairs and its affiliated national research institute from 1991 to 2008 including the period from 2000 to 2002 while she worked for ICCROM seconded by Japan. Her work in these periods covered both domestic and international affairs including that of the World Heritage Convention.

With regard to her experience in Bamiyan, she served the UNESCO safeguarding project and visited the site from time to time, as a member of the Tokyo National Institute of Cultural Properties from 2002-2008.

In April 2008 she took up her current position as professor at the University of Tsukuba. Besides continuing her advisory role to the Japanese central and local authorities on heritage matters, at the university she is teaching and researching the overall system and historical background of cultural heritage studies.  In particular, as a heritage researcher in general, she is concerned with conceptual discussions in the theory and policy study fields -- i.e. authenticity and integrity discussions in the Asian context, historical development of intangible heritage concepts, and studies on the relationship of the culture and nature heritage fields.

She is currently a member of the committee on Cultural Landscapes of the Council for Cultural Affairs, and a member of ICOMOS and its International Scientific Committees on Training and Wooden Structures.

Michael Jansen did his master in architecture and post graduate studies in conservation and heritage management at ICCROM, Rome and at the Scuola di Perfezionamento di Restauro, Universitá di Roma. He completed post graduate studies in South Asian Archaeology at Delhi University and at the ARASI (B.K. Thapar; J.P. Joshi). He obtained his Dr.-Ing. "Architecture of Mohenjo-Daro and the Indus Civilization". He was for 8 years director of the German Research Project Mohenjo-Daro, Pakistan and from there on member of the ICC UNESCO Safe Mohenjo-Daro Campaign. After his tenure at RWTH Aachen he was dean and vice-rector, he was teaching 25 years at the Centre Lémaire, Leuwen, at the summer school in Harvard and at the Daido Institute of Technology Nagoya. Being ICOMOS member for almost 40 years, he worked for many years with Michael Petzet, also since 2002 in Bamiyan. For UNESCO he worked six years in the Otrar Oasis Project and in the Krasnaya Rechka Project Kirgyzstan, both financed by JFIT, Japan.

He worked and still works on the Árchaeological Park Project Mohenjo-Daro, Pakistan and completed for the Oman Government in 2000 the Archaeological Park ´Al Baleed´, the most successful project of its kind on the Arabian Peninsula.

In 2015 he co-organized with ICOMOS Oman the international conference on ´Archaeological Parks´ in Salalah/ Oman.

Presently he is Government advisor in the Sultanate of Oman where he is director at the Research Center "Indian Ocean".

JOKILEHTO Jukka

JOKILEHTO Jukka

Jukka Jokilehto, Prof. Dr. was born in Helsinki (Finland), graduated as architect and city planner at the Polytechnic University of Helsinki; Doctorate in Philosophy (DPhil) at the University of York (UK) in 1986. Worked in Finland as architect and urban planner in the 1960s. Employed by ICCROM from 1972 as the Director in Architectural Conservation, including expert missions, and representation of the organization at ICOMOS and UNESCO. Retired from the position of Assistant Director General in 1998. President of the ICOMOS International Training Committee (1993-2002). ICOMOS World Heritage Advisor 2000-2006. Currently Honorary Member of ICOMOS International. Present position: Consultant and lecturer in architectural and urban conservation. Special Advisor to Director-General of ICCROM; Professor at the University of Nova Gorica (Slovenia), Visiting Professor at University of York. Publications: A History of Architectural Conservation (1999); co-authored with B.M. Feilden: Management of World Cultural Heritage Sites (1993); numerous publications concerning the philosophy of conservation, and the management of World Heritage properties.

Yukio Nishimura teaches urban planning, urban design and urban conservation planning at the Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo.  Majoring in conservation planning, physical urban design and public participation in planning, he has also been involved in drafting conservation plans for a number of historic cities throughout Asia.  He is now President of ICOMOS Japan and had also served as Vice President of ICOMOS International, whose function includes evaluation of World Cultural Heritage nominations as a consultative body of UNESCO.  He has published 8 books including two award-wining “Urban Conservation Planning”(Japanese, Tokyo University Press, 2005, in Japanese) and “Urban Conservation and Urban Design” (Kajima Shuppankai, 1997, in Japanese), edited 34 books including “Urban Landscape Planning”(Gakugei Shuppansha, 2000, in Japanese, Korean translation in 2003), and contributed more than 100 books as co-author or co-editor.

PRAXENTHALER Bert

PRAXENTHALER Bert

Bert Praxenthaler is conservator and project manager for ICOMOS and UNESCO projects in Bamiyan, Afghanistan, in close cooperation with Technical University of Munich and the Ministry of Information and Culture of Afghanistan.

He has worked on the Buddha Missions each year since 2004, salvaging and documenting the remains, stabilizing the niches of the Buddhas, preserving stucco in temple caves, evaluating restoration scenarios, and conducting technical and archaeological research, as well as numerous other projects in conservation and reconstruction in Afghanistan and Germany.

He was educated at the Universities of Regensburg and Munich and holds an MA in Art History, Philosophy, and History from University of Munich. He trained as a conservator and restorer at the Bavarian State Conservation Office, specializing in sculpture and altars, and studied sculpture at the Munich Art School.

SILVERMAN Helaine

SILVERMAN Helaine

Helaine Silverman is Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Collaborative for Cultural Heritage Management and Policy (CHAMP) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA. She is an expert member of ICOMOS’ International Scientific Committee on Archaeological Heritage Management (ICAHM) and ICOMOS’s International Scientific Committee on Cultural Tourism (ICTC). Her primary research focuses on the production and consumption of heritage sites as this engages tourism, economic development, local and national imaginaries, advertising, performances of identity, community rights, and heritage management. She has conducted most of her research in Peru (archaeological and ethnographic projects) with a brief period of fieldwork in Thailand.

Her current research explores official use and local reception of the World Heritage brand in England (Ironbridge Gorge and Durham as the case studies). She also leads a multidisciplinary public engagement initiative at the University of Illinois called I-Heritage (“investigate, interpret, and invest in Illinois”) whose goal is the effective deployment of the state’s cultural heritage resources toward economic development in the downstate region. The pilot project for I-Heritage is directed at towns along the great Mississippi River, which has been a corridor of civilization, commerce, communication and cultural creativity since ancient times. In addition to her own authored works, she is the editor/co-editor of Archaeological Site Museums in Latin America (2006), Cultural Heritage and Human Rights (2007), Intangible Heritage Embodied (2009), Contested Cultural Heritage (2011), Cultural Heritage Politics in China (2013), Encounters with Popular Pasts (2015), Heritage in Action  (2017) and Heritage of Death (in press). She serves on the editorial boards of various journals and is a co-editor of Springer’s “Multidisciplinary Perspectives in Archaeological Heritage Management” book series.

STIG SORENSEN Marie-Louise

STIG SORENSEN Marie-Louise

Marie-Louise Stig Sørensen is Professor of European Prehistory and Heritage Studies at the University of Cambridge and Professor of Bronze Age studies at Leiden University, The Netherland. She coordinates the University of Cambridge’s Postgraduate degree in ‘Archaeological Heritage and Museums’, one of the earliest degree courses in this field. She has considerable research experience, has supervised a large number of PhD projects, and mentored several Post-doctoral researchers.

Her interest within Heritage Studies has mainly focused upon the link between heritage and identity with specific attention towards gender and nationalism, and more recently on post-conflict reconstruction of heritage and how it may impact notions of belonging. She was the PI on the EU funded project ‘Cultural Heritage and the Reconstruction of Identities after Conflict‘ (CRIC 2008-2012. Amongst her publications related to heritage are: ‘Heritage Studies: Methods and Approaches’ (co-edited with John Carman, 2009, Routledge) and ‘War and Cultural Heritage: Biographies of Place’ (co-edited with D. Viejo Rose, 2015, Cambridge University Press). The later provides a range of case studies of reconstruction of heritage sites after conflict.

TANDON Aparna

TANDON Aparna

Working at ICCROM since 2004, Aparna Tandon has specialized in crisis response, risk reduction and recovery of cultural heritage. As a Project Manager at ICCROM she is coordinating its international capacity development programme on disaster risk management and leading its flagship training on First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis (FAC). She has led international FAC courses in Rome, Amsterdam, and Washington D.C.

Additionally, she leads the SOIMA (Sound and Image Collections Conservation) programme aimed at safeguarding endangered audio-visual heritage and promoting its use to sustain intangible heritage. In the past, she has contributed to the planning and implementation of Teamwork for Integrated Emergency Management, a collaborative training initiative of ICCROM launched in the aftermath of the Indian Ocean Tsunami.

She has direct experience of working in complex emergency situations and training non-specialists for recovering cultural heritage. Countries, where Aparna has worked to provide multi-partner emergency responses for cultural heritage include: Haiti, the Philippines, South Sudan, Nepal, Myanmar, Italy, Egypt, and Iraq. Through the ICCROM-ATHAR centre in Sharjah, she has held workshops and field schools for protecting heritage in conflict-afflicted countries including Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Egypt and Iraq.

TURNER Michael

TURNER Michael

Michael Turner is a practicing architect, professor, teaching in the graduate programme of the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, UNESCO Chairholder in Urban Design and Conservation Studies, and UNISDR Advocate.

Serving in many international professional-academic bodies, he is a founding member of the new ICOMOS Scientific Committee PRERICO on religious Sites and Rituals, and combines practice and academia. He has given keynote lectures around the world on major issues of urban conservation and the protection of heritage, contributing many articles on current design issues. He has been, and is, involved in European research projects including Partnership for Peace, TEMPUS/ERASMUS, and a consortium member of Designing Safer Urban Spaces and COST actions. He has prepared a study for the inscription of the Early Synagogues of the Galilee on the Israel Tentative List, identifying outstanding universal values and their attributes.

Within UNESCO, he has advised on Ilha de Mozambique, the German Tentative List the Auschwitz-Birkenau Concentration Camp, and a cultural inventory in Ethiopia, and lately provided advice on conservation for Rio de Janeiro, Bridgetown and Delhi. Chairing Israel’s World Heritage Committee, he was elected in 2005 to the UNESCO Committee and a term as Vice-President. Since its inception in2005, he has accompanied the debate on the Historic Urban Landscape and is currently special advisor to the Director of Heritage. He has participated in expert meetings on authenticity, Category 2 centres, Sustainable Development Goals and World Heritage for Peace, and lately, on memory and reconstruction. At the workshop reviewing the proposed nomination of the Buddhist Hill Monasteries in Korean, he presented a paper on a comparative analysis of religious sites? He has contributed to the UNESCO Global Report on Culture – Urban Futures focusing on Sustainable, Resilient and Green Cities, and has prepared a World Heritage report on Urban Heritage.

YOUNG Christopher

YOUNG Christopher

Christopher Young is a historian and archaeologist who has spent most of his career in the development of approaches to the sustainable management of the historic environment.  He has direct experience of site management and for the last twenty years has been developing expertise in the international field, particularly with regard to the World Heritage Convention.  This has given him considerable experience in dealing with governments and international organisations, particularly with regard to the World Heritage Convention and the development of sustainable approaches to site management and of site management planning in the context of the developing focus on values-led management.  He has considerable experience in negotiation in the national and international contexts and has been much involved with the development of Management Plans.

In the past he has carried out excavations and published extensively on academic topics such as ceramics and trade in Roman Britain and on medieval and later fortifications. Arising out of this, he has worked on policies and practical issues of reconstruction in the UK and further afield, including the development of the 2000 Riga Declaration. His primary expertise now is on the influencing and application of public policy to the protection and enhancement of the historic environment both nationally and internationally, as well as advice on individual places in the UK and overseas.  He is planning to develop research into the history of the UK involvement in the World Heritage Convention.